Year 7

The aim of this year is to inspire future coders and programmers as well as teaching students to think logically. Students will be using the BBC Microbit with its software to create programs suitable for all needs. Some examples of programs that students will create are fortune teller games and digital keyrings. These sessions will be delivered for 1 hour a fortnight.

Year 8

This year will be split into 3 separate workshops, which aims to give students a variety of activities to develop fundamental skills within Computer Science, consisting of Programming, Content and Creativity. These sessions will be delivered for 2 hours a fortnight.

Lego Mindstorms – Control: Devising a solution to a problem through group collaboration, programming Lego robots to perform simple and more complex tasks. Students will reflect and evaluate the programs created to successfully complete a number of challenges.

Theory – How Computers Work: Understanding the basics of Computer Science, including Hardware, Software and Networking.

App Inventor: Linking creativity when developing the layout and style of their app as well as coding their app to function successfully. Students will plan, develop, test and evaluate in this project.

Year 9

This year provides students with a variety of tasks to give them both an insight into the GCSE Computer Science course and to fully prepare them should they choose this as an option. Lessons will include: creative tasks, programming and tasks linked to understanding Computer Science theory. Some of the software that will be used is Microsoft Office, Python, Flash and MIT App Inventor. These sessions will be delivered for 2 hours a fortnight.

Year 10: Computer Science

GCSE Computing J276: OCR

This qualification is relevant to the modern and changing world of technology. Computer Science is a practical subject where students can apply the knowledge and skills learned in the classroom to real-world problems. It is an intensely creative subject that involves invention and excitement.

Computer Science values computational thinking, helping students to develop the skills to solve problems and design systems that do so. These skills will be the best preparation for students who want to go on to study Computer Science at AS and A Level and beyond. Please contact rbroad@saltashcloud.net for further information.

Students may choose this course, or ICT, but not both. Students should choose this course if they are interested in programming and understanding how computers work.

OCR GCSE ComputingDuration
Component 01
Written
Examination
40% of the total
GCSE
Computer Systems
Systems architecture
Memory/ Storage
Wired and wireless networks
Network topologies, protocols, layers
Network security
System software
Moral, social, legal, cultural, environmental concerns
1 hour
30 minutes
Component 02
Written
Examination
40% of the total
GCSE
Computational Thinking, Algorithms and Programming
Translators and facilities of languages
Algorithms
High-and low-level programming
Computational logic
Data representation
1 hour
30 minutes
Component 03
Controlled
Assessment
20% of the total
GCSE
Programming Project
Programming techniques
Design
Development
Effectiveness and efficiency
Technical understanding
Testing, evaluation and conclusion
Approx.
20 hours

There is a significant Maths element in this course – although not a requirement it would be very beneficial if you are achieving Grade 3 or higher in Maths at the end of KS3.

Year 11:

GCSE Computing J276: OCR

This Computer Science qualification is relevant to the modern and changing world of technology. Computer Science is a practical subject where learners can apply the knowledge and skills learned in the classroom to real-world problems. It is an intensely creative subject that involves invention and excitement. Computer Science values computational thinking, helping learners to develop the skills to solve problems and design systems that do so. These skills will be the best preparation for learners who want to go on to study Computer Science at AS and A Level and beyond. Please contact rbroad@saltashcloud.net for further information.

OCR GCSE ComputingDuration
Component 01
Written
Examination
40% of the total
GCSE
Computer Systems
Systems architecture
Memory/ Storage
Wired and wireless networks
Network topologies, protocols, layers
Network security
System software
Moral, social, legal, cultural, environmental concerns
1 hour
30 minutes
Component 02
Written
Examination
40% of the total
GCSE
Computational Thinking, Algorithms and Programming
Translators and facilities of languages
Algorithms
High-and low-level programming
Computational logic
Data representation
1 hour
30 minutes
Component 03
Controlled
Assessment
20% of the total
GCSE
Programming Project
Programming techniques
Design
Development
Effectiveness and efficiency
Technical understanding
Testing, evaluation and conclusion
Approx.
20 hours

There is a significant Maths element in this course – although not a requirement it would be very beneficial if you are working at Grade 3 or higher in Maths at the end of KS3 (According to the new Assessment Framework).

Year 12 & 13: (Sixth Form)

Computer Science
Note: subject to demand an alternative Level 3 course in ICT may be offered instead of Computer Science.

EXAMINATION BOARD
OCR

WHAT IS SPECIAL ABOUT THIS SUBJECT?
This Computer Science qualification focuses on computational thinking, helping students to develop the skills to solve problems, design systems and understand the power and limitations of human and machine intelligence: these are the concepts that lie at the heart of our Computer Science qualification. This qualification will best prepare students who want to go on to study Computer Science at a higher level and will also provide a good grounding for other subject areas that require computational thinking and analytical skills.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS
A grade 4 or above in GCSE ICT or Computing, but other students may be considered at the discretion of the department.

YOU WILL STUDY
Paper 1 – Computing principles
• The characteristics of contemporary processors, input, output and storage devices
• Software and software development
• Programming
• Exchanging data
• Data types, data structures and algorithms
• Legal, moral, ethical and cultural issues.
Paper 2 – Algorithms and problem solving
• Elements of computational thinking
• Problem solving and programming
• Algorithms.

ASSESSMENT
There are two exams, taken at the end of Year 13
• Paper 1: Computing Principles: 2 hours and 30 minutes, 40% of final grade.
• Paper 2: Algorithms and Problem Solving: 2 hours and 30 minutes, 40% of final grade.

There is also a programming coursework project worth 20% of the final grade.

CAREERS & UNIVERSITY PATHWAYS
Computer Science is highly valued in many careers that require problem solving and analytical and computational thinking. This qualification enables students to develop the skills to solve problems and design systems whilst understanding the power and limitations of human and machine intelligence. Computer Science can be studied at university on its own or with various other subjects. The skills developed in Computer Science are used in almost every job or area of life but lend themselves specifically to games and software development, engineering and IT-based analysis and forensics.